Endorsements/Teacher/Special Education

Pk-3 Including Special Education

Early Childhood Special Education

Instructional Strategist I: Mild/Moderate

Instructional Strategist II: Behavior Disorder/Learning Disabilities

Instructional Strategist II: Mental Disabilities

Instructional Strategist II: Physical Disabilities

Mildly Disabled

Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Visually Disabled

14.1(1) Program requirements.

a. The applicant must meet the requirement in rules 282—13.1(272) and 282—13.5(272).

b. The applicant must complete pre-student teaching field-based experiences in special education.

c. Student teaching. Each applicant for an Iowa license with a special education instructional endorsement must file evidence of completing an approved student teaching program in special education. This experience must be full-time in an approved special education classroom. An approved special education classroom is one which is recognized by the state in terms of the respective state rules for special education. This special education student teaching experience shall qualify for each special education instructional endorsement sought on an original application for Iowa licensure if at the same grade level.

d. The applicant must meet the requirements to add an endorsement in rule 282—13.29(272).

14.1(2) Adding special education instructional endorsements to Iowa licenses.


Application for Licensure (Iowa Institution) forms can be found here as .pdf or here as .doc
Application to Add An Endorsement (non-Iowa Institution) forms can be found here as .pdf or here as .doc

a. After the issuance of a practitioner license, an individual may add other special education instructional endorsements to that license upon proper application provided current requirements for the specific endorsement(s) have been met.

b. If an applicant is seeking to add a special education instructional endorsement at the same level, elementary or secondary, as other endorsements held, the student teaching component set out in the rules for added endorsement areas is not required.

c. If the applicant holds the K-8 special education endorsement for the 5-12 endorsement area being added, the applicant may satisfy the requirement for a student teaching experience by completing all the required coursework and presenting verification of competence. This verification of competence shall be signed by a licensed evaluator who has observed and formally evaluated the performance of the applicant at the secondary level.

d. An updated license with expiration date unchanged from the original or renewed license will be prepared. Licensure procedures and requirements are set out in 282—Chapter 13.

282—14.2(272) Specific requirements. For each of the following teaching endorsements in special education, the applicant must have completed 24 semester hours in special education.

 

13.26(3) Teacher—prekindergarten through grade three, including special education.

The holder of this endorsement is authorized to teach children from birth through grade three including students with disabilities.

(NOTE: Because of the nature of the requirements for this endorsement, applicants must complete the teacher preparation institution’s approved program. There is no avenue available for adding this endorsement through the completing of state minimum standards.)


  1. Child growth and development.
    1. Understand the nature of child growth and development for infants and toddlers (birth through age 2), preprimary (age 3 through age 5) and primary school children (age 6 through age 8), both typical and atypical, in areas of cognition, language development, physical motor, social-emotional, aesthetics, and adaptive behavior.
    2. Understand individual differences in development and learning including risk factors, developmental variations and developmental patterns of specific disabilities and special abilities.
    3. Recognize that children are best understood in the contexts of family, culture and society and that cultural and linguistic diversity influences development and learning.

  2. Developmentally appropriate learning environment and curriculum implementation.
    1. Establish learning environments with social support, from the teacher and from other students, for all children to meet their optimal potential, with a climate characterized by mutual respect, encouraging and valuing the efforts of all regardless of proficiency.
    2. Appropriately use informal and formal assessment to monitor development of children and to plan and evaluate curriculum and teaching practices to meet individual needs of children and families.
    3. Plan, implement, and continuously evaluate developmentally and individually appropriate curriculum goals, content, and teaching practices for infants, toddlers, preprimary and primary children based on the needs and interests of individual children, their families and community.
    4. Use both child-initiated and teacher-directed instructional methods, including strategies such as small and large group projects, unstructured and structured play, systematic instruction, group discussion and cooperative decision making.
    5. Develop and implement integrated learning experiences for home-, center- and school-based environments for infants, toddlers, preprimary and primary children.
    6. Develop and implement integrated learning experiences that facilitate cognition, communication, social and physical development of infants and toddlers within the context of parent-child and caregiver-child relationships.
    7. Develop and implement learning experiences for preprimary and primary children with focus on multicultural and nonsexist content that includes development of responsibility, aesthetic and artistic development, physical development and well-being, cognitive development, and emotional and social development.
    8. Develop and implement learning experiences for infants, toddlers, preprimary, and primary children with a focus on language, mathematics, science, social studies, visual and expressive arts, social skills, higher-thinking skills, and developmentally appropriate methodology.
    9. Develop adaptations and accommodations for infants, toddlers, preprimary, and primary children to meet their individual needs.
    10. Adapt materials, equipment, the environment, programs and use of human resources to meet social, cognitive, physical motor, communication, and medical needs of children and diverse learning needs.

  3. Health, safety and nutrition.
    1. Design and implement physically and psychologically safe and healthy indoor and outdoor environments to promote development and learning.
    2. Promote nutritional practices that support cognitive, social, cultural and physical development of young children.
    3. Implement appropriate appraisal and management of health concerns of young children including procedures for children with special health care needs.
    4. Recognize signs of emotional distress, physical and mental abuse and neglect in young children and understand mandatory reporting procedures.
    5. Demonstrate proficiency in infant-child cardiopulmonary resuscitation, emergency procedures and first aid.

  4. Family and community collaboration.
    1. Apply theories and knowledge of dynamic roles and relationships within and between families, schools, and communities.
    2. Assist families in identifying resources, priorities, and concerns in relation to the child’s development.
    3. Link families, based on identified needs, priorities and concerns, with a variety of resources.
    4. Use communication, problem-solving and help-giving skills in collaboration with families and other professionals to support the development, learning and well-being of young children.
    5. Participate as an effective member of a team with other professionals and families to develop and implement learning plans and environments for young children.

  5. Professionalism.
    1. Understand legislation and public policy that affect all young children, with and without disabilities, and their families.
    2. Understand legal aspects, historical, philosophical, and social foundations of early childhood education and special education.
    3. Understand principles of administration, organization and operation of programs for children from birth to age 8 and their families, including staff and program development, supervision and evaluation of staff, and continuing improvement of programs and services.
    4. Identify current trends and issues of the profession to inform and improve practices and advocate for quality programs for young children and their families.
    5. Adhere to professional and ethical codes.
    6. Engage in reflective inquiry and demonstration of professional self-knowledge.

  6. Pre-student teaching field experiences. Complete 100 clock hours of pre-student teaching field experience with three age levels in infant and toddler, preprimary, and primary programs and in different settings, such as rural and urban, encompassing differing socioeconomic status, ability levels, cultural and linguistic diversity and program types and sponsorship.
  7. Student teaching. Complete a supervised student teaching experience of a total of at least 12 weeks in at least two different classrooms which include children with and without disabilities in two of three age levels: infant and toddler, preprimary, and primary.

14.2(1) Early childhood—special education.


Checklist

a. This endorsement authorizes instruction at the PK-K level only for instructional special education programs without regard to the instructional model.

b. The applicant must present evidence of having completed the following program requirements.

  1. Foundations of special education. The philosophical, historical and legal bases for special education, including the definitions and etiologies of individuals with disabilities, exceptional child, and including individuals from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.
  2. Characteristics of learners. Preparation which includes an overview of current trends in educational programming and theories of child development, both typical and atypical; the identification of pre-, peri-, and postnatal development and factors that affect children’s development and learning. Identification of specific disabilities, including the etiology, characteristics, and classification of common disabilities in young children. Application of the knowledge of cultural and linguistic diversity and the significant sociocultural context for the development of and learning in young children.
  3. Assessment, diagnosis and evaluation. Legal provisions, regulations and guidelines regarding unbiased assessment and use of psychometric instruments and instructional assessment measures with individuals with disabilities. Application of assessment results to individualized program development and management, and the relationship between assessment and placement decisions. Knowledge of any specialized strategies such as functional behavioral assessment and any specialized terminology used in the assessment of various disabling conditions. Assess children’s cognitive, social-emotional, communication, motor, adaptive, and aesthetic development; and select, adapt, and administer assessment instruments and procedures for specific sensory and motor disabilities.
  4. Methods and strategies. Methods and strategies which include numerous models to plan and implement appropriate curricular and instructional practices based on knowledge of individual children, the family, the community, and curricular goals and content. Select intervention curricula and methods for children with specific disabilities including motor, sensory, health, communication, social-emotional and cognitive disabilities. Implement developmentally and functionally appropriate individual and group activities using a variety of formats; develop and implement an integrated curriculum that focuses on special education children from birth to age six, and incorporate information and strategies from multiple disciplines in the design of intervention strategies. Curricula for the development of cognitive, academic, social, language and functional life skills for individuals with exceptional learning needs, and related instructional and remedial methods and techniques, including appropriate assistive technology. This preparation must include alternatives for teaching skills and strategies to individuals with disabilities who differ in degree and nature of disability, and the integration of appropriate age- and ability-level academic instruction.
  5. Managing student behavior and social interaction skills. Preparation in individual behavioral management, behavioral change strategies, and classroom management theories, methods, and techniques for individuals with exceptional learning needs. Theories of behavior problems in individuals with disabilities and the use of nonaversive techniques for the purpose of controlling targeted behavior and maintaining attention of individuals with disabilities. Design, implement, and evaluate instructional programs that enhance an individual’s social participation in family, school, and community activities.
  6. Communication and collaborative partnerships. Awareness of the sources of unique services, networks, and organizations for individuals with disabilities including transitional support. Knowledge of family systems, family dynamics, parent rights, advocacy, multicultural issues, and communication to invite and appreciate many different forms of parent involvement. Strategies for working with regular classroom teachers, support services personnel, paraprofessionals, and other individuals involved in the educational program. Knowledge of the collaborative and consultative roles of special education teachers in the integration of individuals with disabilities into the general curriculum and classroom.
  7. Student teaching. Student teaching in a PK-K special education program.

14.2(2) Instructional strategist I: mild and moderate.


Checklist

14.2(3) Instructional strategist II: behavior disorders/learning disabilities.


Checklist


This endorsement authorizes instruction in programs serving students with behavior disorders and learning disabilities from age 5 to age 21 (and to a maximum allowable age in accordance with Iowa Code section 256B.8). The applicant must present evidence of having completed the following program requirements.

  1. Foundations of special education. The philosophical, historical and legal bases for special education, including the definitions and etiologies of individuals with disabilities, exceptional child, and including individuals from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.
  2. Characteristics of learners. Preparation which includes various etiologies of behavior disorders and learning disabilities, an overview of current trends in educational programming for students with behavior disorders and learning disabilities, educational alternatives and related services, and the importance of the multidisciplinary team in providing more appropriate educational programming from age 5 to age 21. Preparation in the social, emotional and behavioral characteristics of individuals with behavior disorders and learning disabilities including the impact of such characteristics on classroom learning as well as associated domains such as social functioning and at-risk behaviors which may lead to involvement with the juvenile justice or mental health system. Preparation in the psychological and social-emotional characteristics of individuals with behavior disorders and learning disabilities must include the major social characteristics of individuals with behavior disorders and the effects of dysfunctional behavior on learning, and the social and emotional aspects of individuals with learning disabilities including social imperceptiveness and juvenile delinquency. Physical development, physical disability and health impairments as they relate to the development and behavior of students with behavior disorders and the medical factors influencing individuals with learning disabilities, including intelligence, perception, memory and language development.
  3. Assessment, diagnosis and evaluation. Legal provisions, regulations and guidelines regarding unbiased assessment and use of psychometric instruments and instructional assessment measures with individuals with disabilities. Application of assessment results to individualized program development and management, and the relationship between assessment and placement decisions. Knowledge of any specialized strategies such as functional behavioral assessment and any specialized terminology used in the assessment of various disabling conditions.
  4. Methods and strategies. Methods and strategies which include numerous models for providing curricular and instructional methodologies utilized in the education of behavior and learning disabled students, and sources of curriculum materials for individuals with disabilities. Curricula for the development of cognitive, academic, social, language and functional life skills for individuals with exceptional learning needs, and related instructional and remedial methods and techniques, including appropriate assistive technology. The focus of these experiences is for students at all levels from age 5 to age 21. This preparation must include alternatives for teaching skills and strategies to individuals with disabilities who differ in degree and nature of disability, and the integration of appropriate age- and ability-level academic instruction.
  5. Managing student behavior and social interaction skills. Preparation in individual behavioral management, behavioral change strategies, and classroom management theories, methods, and techniques for individuals with exceptional learning needs. Theories of behavior problems in individuals with disabilities and the use of nonaversive techniques for the purpose of controlling targeted behavior and maintaining attention of individuals with disabilities. Design, implement, and evaluate instructional programs that enhance an individual’s social participation in family, school, and community activities.
  6. Communication and collaborative partnerships. Awareness of the sources of unique services, networks, and organizations for individuals with disabilities including transitional support. Knowledge of family systems, family dynamics, parent rights, advocacy, multicultural issues, and communication to invite and appreciate many different forms of parent involvement. Strategies for working with regular classroom teachers, support services personnel, paraprofessionals, and other individuals involved in the educational program. Knowledge of the collaborative and consultative roles of special education teachers in the integration of individuals with disabilities into the general curriculum and classroom.
  7. Transitional collaboration. Sources of services, organizations, and networks for individuals with behavior and learning disabilities, including career, vocational and transitional support to postschool settings with maximum opportunities for decision making and full participation in the community.
  8. Student teaching. Student teaching in programs across the age levels of this endorsement. If the student teaching program has a unique age-level emphasis (e.g., K-8 or 5-12), there must be planned activities which incorporate interactive experiences at the other age level.

14.2(4) Instructional strategist II: mental disabilities.


Checklist


This endorsement authorizes instruction in programs serving students with mental disabilities from age 5 to age 21 (and to a maximum allowable age in accordance with Iowa Code section 256B.8). The applicant must present evidence of having completed the following program requirements.

  1. Foundations of special education. The philosophical, historical and legal bases for special education, including the definitions and etiologies of individuals with disabilities, exceptional child, and including individuals from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.
  2. Characteristics of learners. Preparation which includes various etiologies of mental disabilities, an overview of current trends in educational programming for students with mental disabilities, educational alternatives and related services, and the importance of the multidisciplinary team in providing more appropriate educational programming from age 5 to age 21. Preparation must also provide for an overview of the general developmental, academic, social, career and functional characteristics of individuals with mental disabilities as the characteristics relate to levels of instructional support required. This preparation must include the causes and theories of intellectual disabilities and implications and preventions; the psychological characteristics of students with mental and developmental disabilities, including cognition, perception, memory, and language development; medical complications and implications for student support needs, including seizure management, tube feeding, catheterization and CPR; and the medical aspects of intellectual disabilities and their implications for learning. The social-emotional aspects of mental disabilities, including adaptive behavior, social competence, social isolation and learned helplessness.
  3. Assessment, diagnosis and evaluation. Legal provisions, regulations and guidelines regarding unbiased assessment and use of psychometric instruments and instructional assessment measures with individuals with disabilities. Application of assessment results to individualized program development and management, and the relationship between assessment and placement decisions. Knowledge of any specialized strategies such as functional behavioral assessment and any specialized terminology used in the assessment of various disabling conditions.
  4. Methods and strategies. Methods and strategies which include numerous models for providing curricular and instructional methodologies utilized in the education of mentally disabled students, and sources of curriculum materials for individuals with disabilities. Curricula for the development of cognitive, academic, social, language and functional life skills for individuals with exceptional learning needs, and related instructional and remedial methods and techniques. The focus of these experiences is for students at all levels from age 5 to age 21. This preparation must include alternatives for teaching skills and strategies to individuals with disabilities who differ in degree and nature of disability, and the integration of appropriate age- and ability-level academic instruction. Proficiency in adapting age-appropriate curriculum to facilitate instruction within the general education setting, to include partial participation of students in tasks, skills facilitation, collaboration, and support from peers with and without disabilities; the ability to select and use augmentative and alternative communications methods and systems. An understanding of the impact of speech-language development on behavior and social interactions. Approaches to create positive learning environments for individuals with special needs and approaches to utilize assistive devices for individuals with special needs. The design and implementation of age-appropriate instruction based on the adaptive skills of students with mental disabilities; integrate selected related services into the instructional day of students with mental disabilities. Knowledge of culturally responsive functional life skills relevant to independence in the community, personal living, and employment. Use of appropriate physical management techniques including positioning, handling, lifting, relaxation, and range of motion and the use and maintenance of orthotic, prosthetic, and adaptive equipment effectively.
  5. Managing student behavior and social interaction skills. Preparation in individual behavioral management, behavioral change strategies, and classroom management theories, methods, and techniques for individuals with exceptional learning needs. Theories of behavior problems in individuals with mental disabilities and the use of nonaversive techniques for the purpose of controlling targeted behavior and maintaining attention of individuals with disabilities. Design, implement, and evaluate instructional programs that enhance an individual’s social participation in family, school, and community activities.
  6. Communication and collaborative partnerships. Awareness of the sources of unique services, networks, and organizations for individuals with disabilities including transitional support. Knowledge of family systems, family dynamics, parent rights, advocacy, multicultural issues, and communication to invite and appreciate many different forms of parent involvement. Strategies for working with regular classroom teachers, support services personnel, paraprofessionals, and other individuals involved in the educational program. Knowledge of the collaborative and consultative roles of special education teachers in the integration of individuals with disabilities into the general curriculum and classroom.
  7. Transitional collaboration. Sources of services, organizations, and networks for individuals with mental disabilities, including career, vocational and transitional support to postschool settings with maximum opportunities for decision making and full participation in the community.
  8. Student teaching. Student teaching in programs across the age levels of this endorsement. If the student teaching program has a unique age-level emphasis (e.g., K-8 or 5-12), there must be planned activities which incorporate interactive experiences at the other age level.

14.2(5) Instructional strategist II: physical disabilities.



This endorsement authorizes instruction in programs serving students with physical disabilities from age 5 to age 21 (and to a maximum allowable age in accordance with Iowa Code section 256B.8). The applicant must present evidence of having completed the following program requirements.
  1. Foundations of special education. The philosophical, historical and legal bases for special education, including the definitions and etiologies of individuals with disabilities, exceptional child, and including individuals from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.
  2. Characteristics of learners. Preparation which includes various etiologies and characteristics of physical disabilities across the life span, secondary health care issues that accompany specific physical disabilities, an overview of current trends in educational programming for students with physical disabilities, educational alternatives and related services, and the importance of the multidisciplinary team in providing more appropriate educational programming from age 5 to age 21. Preparation must also provide for an overview of the general developmental, academic, social, career and functional characteristics of individuals with physical disabilities as the characteristics relate to levels of instructional support required.
  3. Assessment, diagnosis and evaluation. Legal provisions, regulations and guidelines regarding unbiased assessment and use of psychometric instruments and instructional assessment measures with individuals with disabilities. Application of assessment results to individualized program development and management, and the relationship between assessment and placement decisions. Knowledge of any specialized strategies such as functional behavioral assessment and any specialized terminology used in the assessment of various disabling conditions.
  4. Methods and strategies.
    • Methods and strategies which include numerous models for providing curricular and instructional methodologies utilized in the education of physically disabled students, and sources of curriculum materials for individuals with disabilities. Curricula for the development of cognitive, academic, social, language and functional life skills for individuals with exceptional learning needs, and related instructional and remedial methods and techniques. The focus of these experiences is for students at all levels from age 5 to age 21. This preparation must include alternatives for teaching skills and strategies to individuals with disabilities who differ in degree and nature of disability, and the integration of appropriate age- and ability-level academic instruction.
    • Research-supported instructional practices, strategies, and adaptations necessary to accommodate the physical and communication characteristics of students with physical disabilities, including appropriate assistive technology and alternative positioning to permit students with physical disabilities full participation and access to the general curriculum as well as social environments. Design and implement an instructional program that addresses instruction in independent living skills, vocational skills, and career education for students with physical disabilities and instructional strategies for medical self-management procedures by students.
  5. Managing student behavior and social interaction skills. Preparation in individual behavioral management, behavioral change strategies, and classroom management theories, methods, and techniques for individuals with exceptional learning needs. Theories of behavior problems in individuals with physical disabilities and the use of nonaversive techniques for the purpose of controlling targeted behavior and maintaining attention of individuals with disabilities. Design, implement, and evaluate instructional programs that enhance an individual’s social participation in family, school, and community activities.
  6. Communication and collaborative partnerships. Awareness of the sources of unique services, networks, and organizations for individuals with disabilities including transitional support. Knowledge of family systems, family dynamics, parent rights, advocacy, multicultural issues, and communication to invite and appreciate many different forms of parent involvement. Strategies for working with regular classroom teachers, support services personnel, paraprofessionals, and other individuals involved in the educational program. Knowledge of the collaborative and consultative roles of special education teachers in the integration of individuals with disabilities into the general curriculum and classroom.
  7. Transitional collaboration. Sources of services, organizations, and networks for individuals with physical disabilities, including career, vocational and transitional support to postschool settings with maximum opportunities for decision making and full participation in the community.
  8. Student teaching. Student teaching in programs across the age levels of this endorsement. If the student teaching program has a unique age-level emphasis (e.g., K-8 or 5-12), there must be planned activities which incorporate interactive experiences at the other age level.

14.2(6) K-8 mildly disabled endorsement.


-----(add mildlydisabled.pdf link)------
This endorsement authorizes instruction to mildly disabled children who require special education program adaptations while assigned to a regular classroom for basic instructional purposes, or mildly disabled students placed in a special education class who receive part of their instruction in a regular classroom, or mildly disabled students requiring specially designed instruction while assigned to a regular classroom for basic instructional purposes. To fulfill the requirements for this endorsement, the applicant must:
  1. Hold a regular education instruction endorsement at the elementary level. For the elementary level, this is the general elementary classroom endorsement.
  2. Hold one of the following endorsements at the elementary level: learning disabilities, mild to moderate mentally handicapped, behavioral disorders, multicategorical resource room or multicategorical-special class with integration.

14.2(7) 5-12 mildly disabled endorsement.


This endorsement authorizes instruction to mildly disabled children who require special education program adaptations while assigned to a regular classroom for basic instructional purposes, or mildly disabled students placed in a special education class who receive part of their instruction in a regular classroom, or mildly disabled students requiring specially designed instruction while assigned to a regular classroom for basic instructional purposes. To fulfill the requirements for this endorsement, the applicant must:
  1. Hold a regular education instruction endorsement at the secondary level (grades 5-12).
  2. Hold one of the following endorsements at the secondary level: learning disabilities, mild to moderate mentally handicapped, behavioral disorders, multicategorical resource room or multicategorical-special class with integration.

Note: These endorsements are designed for programs serving primarily mildly and moderately disabled students; the sensory impaired are not included as “mildly disabled.”

14.2(8) Deaf or hard of hearing endorsement. Option 1.


Checklist


This endorsement authorizes instruction in programs serving students with hearing loss from birth to age 21 (and to a maximum allowable age in accordance with Iowa Code section 256B.8). An applicant for this option must complete the following requirements and must have completed an approved program in teaching the deaf or hard of hearing from a recognized Iowa or non- Iowa institution and must hold a regular education endorsement. See 282—Chapter 13.

  1. Foundations of special education. The philosophical, historical and legal bases for special education, including the definitions and etiologies of individuals with disabilities, and including individuals from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.
  2. Characteristics of learners. Preparation which includes various etiologies of hearing loss, an overview of current trends in educational programming for students with hearing loss and educational alternatives and related services, and the importance of the multidisciplinary team in providing more appropriate educational programming from birth to age 21. Preparation in the social, emotional and behavioral characteristics of individuals with hearing loss, including the impact of such characteristics on classroom learning. Knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the hearing mechanism and knowledge of the development of secondary senses when hearing is impaired, effect of hearing loss on learning experiences, psychological aspects of hearing loss, and effects of medications on the hearing system. Preparation in the psychological and social-emotional characteristics of individuals with hearing loss to include the major social characteristics of individuals with hearing loss and the effects of this disability on learning, and the social and emotional aspects of individuals with hearing loss. Physical development and potential health impairments as they relate to the development and behavior of students with hearing loss. Components of linguistic and nonlinguistic communication used by individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing and communication modes used by and with individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, including current theories of language development in individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing.
  3. Assessment, diagnosis and evaluation. Legal provisions, regulations and guidelines regarding unbiased assessment and use of psychometric instruments and instructional assessment measures with individuals with disabilities, including necessary alternative assessment techniques arising out of the nature of the disability and medical reports and other related diagnostic information. Application of assessment results to individualized program development and management, and the relationship between assessment and placement decisions. Knowledge of any specialized strategies such as functional behavioral assessment and any specialized terminology used in the assessment of various disabling conditions.
  4. Methods and strategies. Methods and strategies which include numerous models for providing curricular and instructional methodologies utilized in the education of students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing and sources of specialized materials for individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. These strategies must include knowledge of teaching academic subjects and language and speech to students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing and have knowledge of American Sign Language. Curricula for the development of cognitive, academic, social, language and functional life skills for individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, and related instructional and remedial methods and techniques, including appropriate assistive technology. The focus of these experiences is for students at all levels from birth to age 21. This preparation must include alternatives for teaching skills and strategies to individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing who differ in degree and nature of disability, and the integration of appropriate age- and ability-level academic instruction. Strategies for teaching technology skills and other instructional aids for students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing.
  5. Managing student behavior and social interaction skills. Preparation in individual behavioral management, behavioral change strategies, and classroom management theories, methods, and techniques for individuals with exceptional learning needs. Theories of behavior problems in individuals with disabilities and the use of nonaversive techniques for the purpose of controlling targeted behavior and maintaining attention of individuals with disabilities. Design, implement, and evaluate instructional programs that enhance an individual’s social participation in family, school, and community activities.
  6. Communication and collaborative partnerships. Awareness of the sources of unique services, networks, and organizations for individuals with disabilities, including transitional support. Knowledge of family systems, family dynamics, parent rights, advocacy, multicultural issues, and communication to invite and appreciate many different forms of parent involvement. Strategies for working with regular classroom teachers, support services personnel, paraprofessionals, and other individuals involved in the educational program. Knowledge of the collaborative and consultative roles of special education teachers in the integration of individuals with disabilities into the general curriculum and classroom.
  7. Transitional collaboration. Sources of services, organizations, and networks for individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, including career, vocational and transitional support to postschool settings with maximum opportunities for decision making and full participation in the community.
  8. Student teaching. Student teaching in programs across the age levels of this endorsement. If the student teaching program has a unique age-level emphasis (e.g., K-8 or 5-12), there must be planned activities which incorporate interactive experiences at the other age level.

Deaf or hard of hearing endorsement. Option 2.

An applicant who holds an endorsement in deaf or hard of hearing issued in another state or who is eligible for such an endorsement but who does not hold or is not eligible for a regular education endorsement in Iowa (see 282—Chapter 13) must meet the following basic requirements in addition to those set out in paragraph 14.2(8)“a.”
  1. Child growth and development with emphasis on the emotional, physical, and mental characteristics of elementary age children unless completed as part of the professional education core. See 282—Chapter 13.
  2. Methods and materials of teaching elementary language arts.
  3. Methods and materials of teaching elementary reading.
  4. Elementary curriculum methods and materials unless completed as part of another elementary level endorsement program (e.g., rule 282—13.26(272) or a similar elementary endorsement program).
  5. Methods and materials of teaching elementary mathematics.
  6. Adolescent growth and development with emphasis on the emotional, physical, and mental characteristics of adolescent age children unless completed as part of the professional education core. See 282—subrule 13.18(4).
  7. Adolescent literacy or secondary content area reading.
  8. Secondary methods unless completed as part of the professional education core. See 282— paragraph 13.18(4)“l.”

14.2(9) Visually disabled endorsement. Option 1.


Checklist


This endorsement authorizes instruction in programs serving students with visual disabilities from birth to age 21 (and to a maximum allowable age in accordance with Iowa Code section 256B.8). An applicant for this option must complete the following requirements and must have completed an approved program in visual disabilities from a recognized Iowa or non-Iowa institution and must hold a regular education endorsement. See 282—Chapter 13.

  1. Foundations of special education. The philosophical, historical and legal bases for special education, including the definitions and etiologies of individuals with disabilities, and including individuals from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.
  2. Characteristics of learners. Preparation which includes various etiologies of visual impairment, an overview of current trends in educational programming for students with visual disabilities and educational alternatives and related services, and the importance of the multidisciplinary team in providing more appropriate educational programming from birth to age 21. Preparation in the social, emotional and behavioral characteristics of individuals with visual disabilities, including the impact of such characteristics on classroom learning. Development of the human visual system, development of secondary senses when vision is impaired, effect of visual disability on development, impact of visual disability on learning and experiences, psychological aspects of visual disability, and effects of medications on the visual system. Preparation in the psychological and social-emotional characteristics of individuals with visual disabilities to include the major social characteristics of individuals with visual disabilities and the effects of this disability on learning, and the social and emotional aspects of individuals with visual disabilities. Physical development and potential health impairments as they relate to the development and behavior of students with visual disabilities.
  3. Assessment, diagnosis and evaluation. Legal provisions, regulations and guidelines regarding unbiased assessment and use of psychometric instruments and instructional assessment measures with individuals with disabilities, including necessary alternative assessment techniques arising out of the nature of the disability and medical reports and other related diagnostic information. Application of assessment results to individualized program development and management, and the relationship between assessment and placement decisions. Knowledge of any specialized strategies such as functional behavioral assessment and any specialized terminology used in the assessment of various disabling conditions.
  4. Methods and strategies. Methods and strategies which include numerous models for providing curricular and instructional methodologies utilized in the education of visually disabled students and sources of curriculum materials for individuals with disabilities. These strategies must include knowledge of teaching Braille reading and writing, the skill in teaching handwriting and signature writing to individuals with low vision or who are blind, listening and compensatory auditory skills and typing and keyboarding skills. Curricula for the development of cognitive, academic, social, language and functional life skills for individuals with visual disabilities, and related instructional and remedial methods and techniques, including appropriate assistive technology. The focus of these experiences is for students at all levels from birth to age 21. This preparation must include alternatives for teaching skills and strategies to individuals with visual disabilities who differ in degree and nature of disability, and the integration of appropriate age- and ability-level academic instruction. Strategies for teaching technology skills, other instructional aids for visually disabled students, strategies for teaching organization and study skills, tactual and perceptual skills, adapted physical and recreational skills and strategies for promoting self-advocacy in individuals with visual disabilities and for structured pre-cane orientation and mobility assessment and instruction.
  5. Managing student behavior and social interaction skills. Preparation in individual behavioral management, behavioral change strategies, and classroom management theories, methods, and techniques for individuals with exceptional learning needs. Theories of behavior problems in individuals with disabilities and the use of nonaversive techniques for the purpose of controlling targeted behavior and maintaining attention of individuals with disabilities. Design, implement, and evaluate instructional programs that enhance an individual’s social participation in family, school, and community activities.
  6. Communication and collaborative partnerships. Awareness of the sources of unique services, networks, and organizations for individuals with disabilities, including transitional support. Knowledge of family systems, family dynamics, parent rights, advocacy, multicultural issues, and communication to invite and appreciate many different forms of parent involvement. Strategies for working with regular classroom teachers, support services personnel, paraprofessionals, and other individuals involved in the educational program. Knowledge of the collaborative and consultative roles of special education teachers in the integration of individuals with disabilities into the general curriculum and classroom.
  7. Transitional collaboration. Sources of services, organizations, and networks for individuals with visual disabilities, including career, vocational and transitional support to postschool settings with maximum opportunities for decision making and full participation in the community.
  8. Student teaching. Student teaching in programs across the age levels of this endorsement. If the student teaching program has a unique age-level emphasis (e.g., K-8 or 5-12), there must be planned activities which incorporate interactive experiences at the other age level.

Visually disabled endorsement. Option 2.

An applicant who holds an endorsement in deaf or hard of hearing issued in another state or who is eligible for such an endorsement but who does not hold or is not eligible for a regular education endorsement in Iowa (see 282—Chapter 13) must meet the following basic requirements in addition to those set out in paragraph 14.2(8)“a.”
  1. Child growth and development with emphasis on the emotional, physical, and mental characteristics of elementary age children unless completed as part of the professional education core. See 282—Chapter 13.
  2. Methods and materials of teaching elementary language arts.
  3. Methods and materials of teaching elementary reading.
  4. Elementary curriculum methods and materials unless completed as part of another elementary level endorsement program (e.g., rule 282—13.26(272) or a similar elementary endorsement program).
  5. Methods and materials of teaching elementary mathematics.
  6. Adolescent growth and development with emphasis on the emotional, physical, and mental characteristics of adolescent age children unless completed as part of the professional education core. See 282—subrule 13.18(4).
  7. Adolescent literacy or secondary content area reading.
  8. Secondary methods unless completed as part of the professional education core. See 282— paragraph 13.18(4)“l.”